The U.S. was not founded as a Christian nation

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Meme's are a quick and pithy way to get a larger message across in a way that sticks in your memory. As they reflect our view of the world and our own personality they are frequently humorous, sarcastic and witty. However, in like fashion they can also be unamusing, pungent and sardonic. They are a ripe medium for inaccurate or straight up false information.

In this article I will be addressing the assurtions put forth by the meme below, starting with the supplied "quotes" which are also quotes commonly heard from the lips of atheists. All of these are false and I destroy them below.
 
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"Christianity is the most perverted system that ever shone on man."
— Thomas Jefferson

SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; DIPLOMAT;
GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA; SECRETARY OF STATE; THIRD PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

This is a cherry picked and spurious quote that atheists, socialists and communists love to use as a prooftext. It isn't even the full sentence. Simply put it is taken out of context and does not mean what it has been twisted into. 

Here is the sentence: "This was the real ground of all the attacks on you: those who live by mystery & charlatanerie, fearing you would render them useless by simplifying the Christian philosophy, the most sublime & benevolent, but most perverted system that ever shone on man, endeavored to crush your well earnt, & well deserved fame."

He was not saying that Christianity is a perverted system, but that people twist it to their own whims. That is the perversion of which he speaks. The letter in full can be found here: From Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Priestley, 21 March 1801

Authentic quotes by Thomas Jefferson
• "The doctrines of Jesus are simple, and tend all to the happiness of man." (1)
• "The practice of morality being necessary for the well being of society, He [God] has taken care to impress its precepts so indelibly on our hearts that they shall not be effaced by the subtleties of our brain. We all agree in the obligation of the moral principles of Jesus and nowhere will they be found delivered in greater purity than in His discourses." (2)
• "I am a Christian in the only sense in which He wished anyone to be: sincerely attached to His doctrines in preference to all others." (3)
• "I am a real Christian – that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus Christ." (4)


 
"I have found Christian dogma unintelligible."
— Benjamin Franklin

SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION; DIPLOMAT; PRINTER; SCIENTIST;
SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; GOVERNOR OF PENNSYLVANIA

After much searching, I found a source claim for this quote that pointed to the book TOWARD THE MYSTERY by Rev. William Edelen. I have not found even ONE alternate source for this quote, but there are hundreds of atheist sites that love to quote this spurious cliche. As such this quote is very dubious and I sincerely doubt it's authenticity. 

Authentic quotes by Benjamin Franklin
• "As to Jesus of Nazareth, my opinion of whom you particularly desire, I think the system of morals and His religion as He left them to us, the best the world ever saw or is likely to see." (5)
• "The body of Benjamin Franklin, printer, like the cover of an old book, its contents torn out and stripped of its lettering and guilding, lies here, food for worms. Yet the work itself shall not be lost; for it will, as he believed, appear once more in a new and more beatiful edition, corrected and amended by the Author." (6) (FRANKLIN’S EULOGY THAT HE WROTE FOR HIMSELF)


 
"This would be the best of all possible worlds if there were no religion in it."
— John Adams

SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; JUDGE; DIPLOMAT; ONE OF TWO SIGNERS
OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS; SECOND PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Once again, this is a cherry picked and spurious quote. Atheists attribute this as a direct and meaningful quote from Adams against Christianity. This is however, the near opposite to what he actually said, 
"Twenty times, in the course of my late Reading, have I been upon the point of breaking out, 'This would be the best of all possible Worlds, if there were no Religion in it'!!! But in this exclamati[on] I Should have been as fanatical as Bryant or Cleverly. Without Religion this World would be Something not fit to be mentioned in polite Company, I mean Hell."
The letter in full can be found here: From John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 19 April 1817

Authentic quotes by John Adams:
• "The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God." (7)
• "Without religion, this world would be something not fit to be mentioned in polite company: I mean hell." (8)
• "The Christian religion is, above all the religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern times, the religion of wisdom, virtue, equity and humanity. (9)
• "Suppose a nation in some distant region should take the Bible for their only law book and every member should regulate his conduct by the precepts there exhibited. . . . What a Eutopia – what a Paradise would this region be! (10)
• "I have examined all religions, and the result is that the Bible is the best book in the world." (11)


 
"The Constitution is the guide which I never will abandon."
— George Washington

JUDGE; MEMBER OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS;
COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE CONTINENTAL ARMY;
PRESIDENT OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION;
FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES; “FATHER OF HIS COUNTRY”

This was spoken by George Washington during his address to the Boston Selectmen on July 28, 1795. There is nothing wrong with this quote, which makes me wonder why it was included. It puts value to our country's Constitution and he vowed that he will never abandon it. Contrast that with the traitors in our government today…
The address in full can be found here: From George Washington to Boston Selectmen, 28 July 1795

Authentic quotes by George Washington
• "You do well to wish to learn our arts and ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ. These will make you a greater and happier people than you are." (12)
• "While we are zealously performing the duties of good citizens and soldiers, we certainly ought not to be inattentive to the higher duties of religion. To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest glory to add the more distinguished character of Christian." (13)
• "The blessing and protection of Heaven are at all times necessary but especially so in times of public distress and danger. The General hopes and trusts that every officer and man will endeavor to live and act as becomes a Christian soldier, defending the dearest rights and liberties of his country." (14)
• "I now make it my earnest prayer that God would… most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility, and pacific temper of the mind which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion." (15)

 
ENDNOTES:
1. Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Albert Bergh, editor (Washington, D. C.: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Assoc., 1904), Vol. XV, p. 383, to Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse on June 26, 1822.

2. Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Alberty Ellery Bergh, editor (Washington D.C.: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), Vol. XII, p. 315, to James Fishback, September 27, 1809.

3. Thomas Jefferson, Memoir, Correspondence, and Miscellanies from the Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson Randolph, editor (Boston: Grey & Bowen, 1830), Vol. III, p. 506, to Benjamin Rush, April 21, 1803.

4. Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Albert Ellery Bergh, editor (Washington, D.C.: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), Vol. XIV, p. 385, to Charles Thomson on January 9, 1816.

5. Benjamin Franklin, Works of Benjamin Franklin, John Bigelow, editor (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1904), p. 185, to Ezra Stiles, March 9, 1790.

6. Benjamin Franklin, Works of the Late Doctor Benjamin Franklin (Dublin: P. Wogan, P. Byrne, J. More, and W. Janes, 1793), p. 149.

7. Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (Washington D. C.: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), Vol. XIII, p. 292-294. In a letter from John Adams to Thomas Jefferson on June 28, 1813.

8. John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States, Charles Francis Adams, editor (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1856), Vol. X, p. 254, to Thomas Jefferson on April 19, 1817.

9. John Adams, Works, Vol. III, p. 421, diary entry for July 26, 1796.

10. John Adams, Works, Vol. II, pp. 6-7, diary entry for February 22, 1756.

11. John Adams, Works, Vol. X, p. 85, to Thomas Jefferson on December 25, 1813.

12. George Washington, The Writings of Washington, John C. Fitzpatrick, editor (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1932), Vol. XV, p. 55, from his speech to the Delaware Indian Chiefs on May 12, 1779.

13. George Washington, The Writings of Washington, John C. Fitzpatrick, editor (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1932), Vol. XI, pp. 342-343, General Orders of May 2, 1778.

14. George Washington, The Writings of George Washington, John C. Fitzpatrick, editor (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1932), Vol. 5, p. 245, July 9, 1776 Order.

15. George Washington, The Last Official Address of His Excellency George Washington to the Legislature of the United States (Hartford: Hudson and Goodwin, 1783), p. 12; see also The New Annual Register or General Repository of History, Politics, and Literature, for the Year 1783 (London: G. Robinson, 1784), p. 150.

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